Tuesday, March 29, 2011

Which book would you pass on to future generations?

Which book would you pass on to future generations? Got the idea from The Guardian Books -

Mine off the top of my head, for knowledge of early pioneer America? - Conrad Richter's trilogy - The Trees, The Fort, The Town

Put your choice in the comments section.....

10 comments:

andie said...

I'd put Le Petit Prince (the little Prince) from Antoine de Saint Exupery.It's a beautiful tale and everybody should read it

c. woodward said...

Eagle in the Snow by Wallace Breem

Roe said...

Captains Courageous, by Rudyard Kipling.....

Romary

scaubrey said...

To Kill a Mockingbird, from shelley

Ann said...

Richard Bach's Illusions: The Adventures of a Reluctant Messiah.

It is an easy, delightful read that provides a simple explanation for the was we create reality.

Underdog1320 said...

The Bible, and "To Kill A Mockingbird" by Harper Lee

sven said...

The Fatal Shore from Robert Hughes. The sad history of the transportation of English convicts to Australia.

Jackie W said...

A New Earth by Eckart Tolle

Isis said...

Killer Angels by Michael Shaara about the Battle of Gettysburg. It won the Pulitzer Prize, was one of the top 100 American Fiction Books as chosen by American Heritage and it was the basis for the movie Gettysburg.

Kathleen said...

Mary, I simply cannot recommend just one, single book to pass onto future generations! A truly impossible task for me, since, my list of favorites is too long...sorry...And, besides that; I am still waiting to see your book on "shelfari" - especially after re-reading the wonderful tribute to your mother today. :)

Moving right along, have you read Bill Bryson's A Short History of Nearly Everything: Special Illustrated Edition? I haven't seen this edition yet, but, time for a re-read, I think. Came across this quote that has renewed my interest:

"If this book has a lesson, it is that we are awfully lucky to be here-and by 'we' I mean every living thing. To attain any kind of life in this universe of ours appears to be quite an achievement. As humans we are doubly lucky, of course: We enjoy not only the privilege of existence but also the singular ability to appreciate it and even, in a multitude of ways, to make it better. It is a talent we have only barely begun to grasp."
- Bill Bryson (A Short History of Nearly Everything)

Also curious, have you read A Walk in the Woods... or any of his other books? Any possible recommendations?

On another note, RC, enjoy your day (June 3rd) at Durham University with Bill Bryson! What an amazing opportunity for the DST students, members and staff!

"The mediocre teacher tells. The good teacher explains. The superior teacher demonstrates. The great teacher inspires."
- William A. Ward